Monday, October 19, 2020

HANUMAN- DHOKA DURRBAR SQUARE

 #nepalwonderstreks #nepalwonders #trekkinginnepal

                                                           HANUMAN- DHOKA DURRBAR SQUARE


A large portion of the social places of Nepal are concentrated around the Kathmandu Valley: among those social locales, the significant one is the Hanuman-dhoka Durbar Square situated at the core of antiquated city Kathmandu, it is a complex of wonderful sanctuaries and sanctums, both Hindu and Buddhist. The vast majority of them are underlying the pagoda style adorned with unpredictably cut outsides, worked between the twelfth and eighteenth hundreds of years. The Durbar Square with its old sanctuaries, castles, typifies the strict and social existence of the individuals. It is here that rulers of Nepal are delegated and their crowning ceremonies solemnized. Until the mid-twentieth century, Durbar Square was the King's living arrangement. It is a living open historical center of Nepal. 



The name Hanuman-dhoka Durbar originated from the sculpture of Hanuman set up by King Pratap Malla at the passageway of the illustrious castle in 1672 A.D. The nine-storeyed habitation worked by King Prithvi Narayan Shah in 1770, is called Basantapurr Durbar. The entire complex is otherwise called Kathmandu Durbar Square. The royal residence complex was initially established during the Lichchavi time frame, yet as it stands today the vast majority of it was developed by King Pratap Malla in the seventeenth century. The royal residence was redesigned ordinarily in later years. The building remains and workmanship objects inside the castle complex presently existing are from the Malla, Shah, and Rana times of Nepal. 


The Durbar Square region is really comprised of two sub-zones. The external complex is eminent for various fascinating sanctuaries as Kumari Ghar, Kasthamandap, Shiva-Parbati Temple, Jagannath Temple, Big Bell, and so forth, while the internal complex includes the old castle territory, Hanuman-dhoka and its yards as Nasal Chowk, Lohan Chowk, Mohan Chowk, Basantapur Durbar and others. There are many temples in the inner complex also, most notably being the Taleju Temple dedicated to female royal deity, The area includes ten courtyards these days, but prior the great earthquake of 1934, the area was expanded up to New Road Gate including thirty-five courtyards.

The Hanuman-dhoka  Royal palace is included in the protected Monument one along with other private buildings. The site is enlisted in the World Heritage Site of UNESCO along with other six monument zones of Kathmandu Valley in October 1979.

Besides the magnificent temples and shrines, other interesting aspects are various festivals, cultural activities and traditions people are following from centuries, which are presented in the Durbar Square,

Sunday, October 18, 2020

MANASLU CIRCUIT TREK

 #nepalwonderstreks

#nepalwonders

#budgettrekkingpackageinnepal

https://www.nepalwonderstreks.com/


                                                           MANASLU CIRCUIT TREK

#nepalwonders

The trip on an old path along which you appreciate credible Nepali culture and neighborliness guarantees amazing perspectives on Manaslu and other Himalayan pinnacles consistently on the foundation. You get the opportunity to observe old societies and the practically middle age way of life of the individuals as you journey up north towards the pinnacles. 
Protected from modernization and commercialization, the nearby individuals' way of life has changed minimally throughout the long term, in this manner holding their virtue. So your journey to Manaslu will be much the same as time-travel. returning as expected. The path has teahouses en route for a night stop, yet one could pick an outdoor trip and rest under the stars.


There is web access, and telephones just as other electronic gadgets can be charged at the teahouses along the path. The journey makes for an incredible photo opportunity so you will have something to reclaim home to think back about. All you require is a nice camera. 

Manaslu shares a lot of its way of life and history with its neighboring region, Tibet. Buddhism is a significant religion here as exhibited by the Buddhist cloisters, the engineering, and conventions as far as possible. 

The district, which was authoritatively opened to unfamiliar sightseers just in 1991, falls in the Restricted zone and travelers must get a Trekking Permit from the Department of Immigration notwithstanding the TIMS card to enter this locale.

Sunday, August 9, 2020

LIST OF CLOTHING EQUIPMENT & PERSONAL EFFECTS FOR BACKPACKING 

#nepalwonderstreks
#nepalwonders


LIST OF CLOTHING EQUIPMENT & PERSONAL EFFECTS FOR BACKPACKING 

- Lightweight walking boots. If new one is being bought, "walk then in" to avoid blisters. Also, bring spares laces.

- A pair of track shoes. To wear in the camp at night or when the boot is wet.

-Warm jacket. Fiberfill or down should be adequate. This is especially necessary during winter from December to February.

- A rainproof jacket with hood or a punch. Get the one that is guaranteed waterproof.

-Woolen shirts and thick sweaters. During winter months December through February, these items are essential. Thick sweaters can be purchased in Kathmandu.

-A pair of lightweight/heavyweight trousers are useful higher up in the mountains in the morning and at night. Windproof/waterproof trousers. A necessity on all treks going above 10,000ft.

-Thermal underwear. These are excellent to sleep in at night. In the winter months, thermal underwear is quite invaluable.

-A tracksuit. Useful for wearing in camp and in the tent.

- 1-2 pair of loose-fitting long shorts/skirts

-2-4 cotton t-shirts.

- 1 lightweight long sleeved-shirts is particularly suitable for avoiding sunburn.

-A woolen hat to wear in the morning and at night. During winter it is an essential item. A sunhat and ensure it has a wide brim to cover the face and neck.

- A pair of gloves. Leather with lining and woolen are best.

- 1 pair of sandals to wear in the cities and in camp.

- 2 pairs of thin and 2 pairs of thick woolen socks

-Underwear: normal quantity and swimming costume ankles


EQUIPMENT

-Duffle bag or kit bag to carry to gear while trekking.

-Daypack. This is a small rucksack to carry personal requirement for the day eg. toilet items, camera, film, towel, soap. a boot etc.

-Water bottle.

-Snow glasses and sunglasses.

-2-4 large plastic bags to separate clean clothes from dirty ones, 6-10 smaller plastic bags to dispose of garbage.

-Wallet and/or money belt with compartment for coins

-Toiletries with large and small towels. Toilet paper can be buy-in Kathmandu and some villages in the mountains.

-Small headlamp and/or torch with spare batteries and bulbs, candles and lighter to burn toilet paper.

-Snow gaiters essential during winter and all treks going over at other times.

-An umbrella (optional) which is quite useful to ward of the dogs, suitable as a walking stick, to use as a sunshade and useful when it rains.

-Reading materials, camera and film, game items (optional), notebook, rubber band, pen and pencil envelopes, a diary, a calendar, a pocket knife, binoculars (optional), A small pillow or headrest (optional) Thermarest (optional)- an inflatable sleeping mat, trekking map, adequate quantities of a passport photograph.

-Personal medical supplies.



https://www.nepalwonderstreks.com/




Saturday, July 25, 2020

TREKKING GENERAL INFORMATION


  • TREKKING GENERAL INFORMATION
#wanderlust

INTRODUCTION

The Nepal Himalaya has always been known as"The Abode of the Gods". Many of the primordial history, religion, culture, and tradition as well as legends and myths emanate from the awesome Himalaya. The Nepal Himalaya harbors many holy temples and shrines, monasteries and sacred lakes in the wilderness and remote parts of the region. These sites are frequently visited by pilgrims. It is a land of piety and stillness.

The Himalayas is the youngest and highest mountain chain on earth. A full third of its stretches- the formidable Great Himalayan Range of 800 Kilometers lies within the Nepal Himalaya. It has a convergence of 1310 magnificent peaks of 8000 meters. Nestling in the rain shadows of these unique vistas of soaring summits unravels a profusion of lofty foothills, the home of the many Nepalese who delight in warm hospitality and friendship. These verdant terraced hills meander down to lush green valleys with turbulent rivers and to the tropical lowland and jungles teeming with countless wildlife.

In its immensely diverse and undulating topography, varied climate, and mix of people Nepal combines to produce a magical attraction for outsiders. Many foreign visitors come to trek one or more beautiful trekking regions. To trek, one does not have to be bizarre, neither a mountaineer nor an athlete. Anyone with a pair of strong legs, and the spirit for adventure to explore the exotic, will enjoy the thrills of trekking in the hills of Nepal. Walking in the interior of the country follows ancient foot trails that meander through the scenic river banks, intricately terraced fields, and the forested ridges connecting picturesque hamlets and mountain villages. these highly developed and well-defined trails have been used for centuries and are the hive of activities to come in contact with the locals.

For visitors on an extended day and with fewer restraints, there is an even more varied spectrum of adventure- be it rafting on the sparkling rivers, safaris in the jungles, trekking to explore deeper into the alpine valley with perpetual snow and glistering glaciers. The more intrepid traveller may venture further up to scale any of the 18 minor trekking peaks.



Sunday, July 5, 2020

MIGHTY HIMALAYAS OF NEPAL

#nepalwonderstreks
#nepalwonders
#wondersoftheworld
#wanderlust

                                                       MIGHTY HIMALAYAS OF NEPAL

Nepal has designated the Annapurna, Manaslu and Kanchenjunga regions as Conservation Areas while Sagarmatha (Everest), Langtang and Shey-Phoksundo (Dolpo) are national parks while other mountain areas might not fall into these categories but are designated as ‘Restricted Areas’ as they are close to Nepal’s northern border. While the infrastructure of, and accessibility to Sagarmatha, Annapurna, Manaslu, and Langtang are well developed and easily accessible enabling mountaineers and expeditions to make quick progress to their base camps the remaining areas, including the restricted areas, are still very remote, where rescue or help from external sources will be difficult or unlikely and access to these areas is complex and at times difficult. Expeditions into those areas require a completely different approach, level of commitment, and organizational ability to succeed on their chosen summit.
The mountains of Nepal are grouped into different categories depending on their height and under whose authority they lie. The Ministry of Tourism is responsible for the expedition peaks above 6,500 m, while the Nepal Mountaineering Association is responsible for mountains that are known as Trekking Peaks. These peaks range in altitude from 5,800 m to 6,584 m, and call for climbing skills and climbing gear and should not be taken lightly despite the misleading title. Expeditions to peaks below 5800metres do not require climbing permits although they will require other forms of permits to enter specific regions. All expeditions are required to pay refundable garbage deposits while expeditions to peaks above 6,500 m will also be required to employ a Liaison Officer. The best time for mountaineering expeditions is pre-monsoon when the weather is better, especially at altitude, although the visibility might be restricted with the pending monsoon conditions. Autumn is good for the slightly lower peaks, while winter is cold with short days and early spring might be subjected to seasonal snowstorms. However, in these times of global warming and climate change, the seasons are no longer as predictable as they used to be.
Today in Nepal it is possible to book onto either a commercial expedition to attempt any of the larger mountains or to attempt a trekking peak with one of the many Nepali trekking agents. If an independent expedition wishes to attempt any of the ‘legally’ open peaks then they should read the appropriate policies and procedures legally required under the current Nepal Tourism Act (Provisions relating to Mountaineering).

Monday, June 29, 2020

DOLPO REGION

#nepalwonderstreks
#nepalwonders
#wanderlust
#travelnepal





Trekking in the remote district of Dolpo leads through picturesque, concealed valleys and antiquated hallowed places like Shey Gompa. getting a charge out of captivating perspectives on the flawless waters of Phoksundo Lake, experiencing yak convoys that cross the high-Himalayan passes and mountain individuals who live in probably the most noteworthy settlements on earth like the Dho-Tarap valley; Dolpo is amazing.

Dolpo's unprecedented common magnificence was perfectly caught in the Oscar designated film"Caravan". Trekking in this Himalayan locale is an exceptional experience.

Dolpo is kept by the Dhaulagiri run in the south and east, Mt. Sisne and Kanjiroba in the west, and the Tibetan plateau towards the north. Lake Phoksundo's gleaming turquoise waters never neglects to entrance guests, making it one of the significant attractions of Dolpo.

Settlements here are for the most part at stunning elevations of 3,660 m to 4,070 m and the individuals are ardent Buddhists who have been exchanging with Tibet for a considerable length of time. There are 130 gompas (Buddhist cloisters) in Dolpo which says a lot for their strict enthusiasm.

One of the brilliant minutes during the trek is seeing long yak processions that even today persevere through tremendous difficulties arranging the unforgiving, frigid territory, crossing high mountain passes, conveying merchandise for trade to the opposite side of the Himalayas.

Firmly connected with Tibet, the individuals speak Tibetan, look Tibetan, and hold their Tibetan legacy and culture which are featured by strict services in their religious communities where Tibetan Buddhism prevails. Little has changed in the lifestyle for these tough individuals who carefully follow the traditions and convictions of their ancestors who came over from Tibet hundreds of years back. This trek is a chance to meet these straightforward people who live under outrageous conditions simply getting by.

Opened up for the travel industry just in 1989, these high mountain valleys stayed unexplored and generally inconspicuous by untouchables. Detached by the troublesome geography, the individuals in this district have protected their way of life and carry on with an actual existence immaculate by the trappings of current society.

Dolpo is one of the Restricted Areas of Nepal so trekkers require a Trekking Permit from the Department of Immigration notwithstanding the TIMS card to trek in this locale. Trekkers must be incredibly fit to persevere through the long and exhausting stretches in transit.

Sunday, June 28, 2020

MOUNTAINEERING IN NEPAL

#nepalwonderstreks
#nepalwonders
#wanderlust


                                                         MOUNTAINEERING IN NEPAL


With eight of the world's highest mountains in the country, Nepal is a mountaineer's paradise. The ultimate glory of mountaineering is reaching the summit of Mt. Everest, but there are other technical challenges like Lhotse beside it or you can take on any of the other 326 climbing peaks that are waiting for you!
Nepal Himalaya is the most formidable mountain range in the world with nearly a third of the country lying above the elevation of  3,500 m. Eight of the world's highest peaks lie within Nepal's territory: Everest, Kanchenjunga, Lhotse, Makalu, Cho Oyu, Dhaulagiri, Manaslu, and Annapurna, which are all over 8,000 m above sea level. The first to be climbed among them was Annapurna in 1950 by a French Expedition with Maurice Herzog as a leader while Everest was first summitted by Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay in 1953 with a British Expedition led by John Hunt.
Besides these eight giant peaks, there are 326 other mountains within Nepal which are open for mountaineering expeditions, and out of them, 103 have never been climbed before. Nepal offers mountaineers more opportunities than any other country in the world and throws endless challenges at them including the less glorified trekking peaks which still require climbing gear and climbing skills if you want to climb them. 
Nepal's climbing history goes back a long way starting with the early explorers from British India who were lured by lofty peaks and the challenges of climbing virgin peaks where no human had set foot before. By the 1960s Nepal's trekking and mountaineering industry were well established with private companies providing all logistics including porters and guides for a full expedition that would spend months in the mountains. Today there are many companies that will take care of every aspect of mountain climbing and all the mountaineer has to do is arrive in good shape physically and mentally, prepared to take on the challenge and not worry about equipment and supplies.  Most of the Everest expeditions are handled by well-known and trusted private companies.
The reputation of the Sherpas is built on mountaineering with many of these mountain people achieving glorified status with their multiple climbs of Everest and other 8000m peaks. Most expeditions wouldn't go up without the loyal, hardy, and extremely reliable sherpas. They risk their lives for their clients and are often called upon to rescue a climber in trouble. Although today there are many other ethnic groups involved in the service, they are generally referred to as Sherpas.
Despite all the attention being grabbed by mountains like Everest and Annapurna, the latter more for trekking than climbing, there are other peaks being climbed on a regular basis but don't make headline news. Lhotse, Ama Dablam, and Manaslu are also climbed often besides trekking peaks like Mera, Island, and Yala peaks which are quite popular. Ther are also climbers looking to climb virgin peaks as Nepal from time to time, opens up new, unheard of peaks for climbing, and who wouldn't want to be the first to climb! 
Nepal has designated the Annapurna, Manaslu and Kanchenjunga regions as Conservation Areas while Sagarmatha (Everest), Langtang and Shey-Phoksundo (Dolpo) are national parks while other mountain areas might not fall into these categories but are designated as ‘Restricted Areas’ as they are close to Nepal’s northern border. While the infrastructure of, and accessibility to Sagarmatha, Annapurna, Manaslu, and Langtang are well developed and easily accessible enabling mountaineers and expeditions to make quick progress to their base camps the remaining areas, including the restricted areas, are still very remote, where rescue or help from external sources will be difficult or unlikely and access to these areas is complex and at times difficult. Expeditions into those areas require a completely different approach, level of commitment, and organizational ability to succeed on their chosen summit.
The mountains of Nepal are grouped into different categories depending on their height and under whose authority they lie. The Ministry of Tourism is responsible for the expedition peaks above 6,500 m, while the Nepal Mountaineering Association is responsible for mountains that are known as Trekking Peaks. These peaks range in altitude from 5,800 m to 6,584 m, and call for climbing skills and climbing gear and should not be taken lightly despite the misleading title. Expeditions to peaks below 5800metres do not require climbing permits although they will require other forms of permits to enter specific regions. All expeditions are required to pay refundable garbage deposits while expeditions to peaks above 6,500 m will also be required to employ a Liaison Officer. The best time for mountaineering expeditions is pre-monsoon when the weather is better, especially at altitude, although the visibility might be restricted with the pending monsoon conditions. Autumn is good for the slightly lower peaks, while winter is cold with short days and early spring might be subjected to seasonal snowstorms. However, in these times of global warming and climate change, the seasons are no longer as predictable as they used to be.
Today in Nepal it is possible to book onto either a commercial expedition to attempt any of the larger mountains or to attempt a trekking peak with one of the many Nepali trekking agents. If an independent expedition wishes to attempt any of the ‘legally’ open peaks then they should read the appropriate policies and procedures legally required under the current Nepal Tourism Act (Provisions relating to Mountaineering).